News

This page is organized as follows:

**NEW** SAHRA Information – Oct 15, 2017 
Is Heritage in Toronto’s Future?
Avenue Road Developments
Halloween Events
The Good Neighbour Guide
Toronto Water: Not Down the Drain Campaign
New Parking Violation Dispute Process
Armour Heights Christmas Bazaar
Fall Maintenance
Toronto Aviation Noise Group (T.A.N.G.) Update
SAHRA Information – Oct 15, 2017

SAHRA Information – Sep 18, 2017 
York Mills Eyecare 25th Anniversary Open House
“Please slow down” Signs
Toronto Local Appeal Body (TLAB)
Upgrades to Woburn and Brookdale Parks
Armour Heights Christmas Bazaar
SAHRA Information – Sep 18 2017

SAHRA Information – Sep 13, 2017 
Armour Heights Community Centre Children’s Programs
Avenue Road Bridge
Presentation on Toronto Pearson Airport concentrated Jetpath Noise Issue
250 Lawrence Avenue West
1780 Avenue Road
1580 Avenue Road
Armour Heights Christmas Bazaar
SAHRA Information _ Sept 13, 2017

Avenue Road Bridge

Toronto Pearson Airport Presentation

Spring 2017 Newsletter
Newsletter Spring 2017
Neighbours’ Night Out – Tues, June 13, 2017
Basement Sprawl
250 Lawrence Ave West
1560 Avenue Road (at Douglas)
Ridley Watermain Cleaning/Relininhg
The Brookdale (1700 Avenue Rd)
Spped Humps on Elm Road
Avenue Road Avenue Study

2017 SAHRA Membership Drive

Articles: (filed after the SAHRA Information emails)
Reimagining Yonge Study Proposes Major Changes in North York
Housing Choices and Prices in the GTA
The Future of the Greenbelt
The Ugliest Side of Toronto’s Ravines
Scuttled Crosstown deal sparks debate about Toronto transit and development
Growing Pains documentary

Ward Boundary Changes (Oct 23, 2016)
Pusateri’s Fine Foods Updates
If you are writing to a City official or organization…

Waste Strategy
Update on Noise Bylaw Review
90 Eglinton Avenue West (24 storey building in a Mid-Rise building area)

Newsletters
Rodent Control
Proposed Yonge-401 Bypass Trail
Toronto’s Tree Canopy
Flooding –
Basement Flooding & Water Quality Improvement Study
Flooding Issue: Request for a By-law change to require permanent capping of old sewer laterals prior to Demolition
Basement Flooding / Downspout Disconnection Program
Basement Flooding Subsidy Program, City of Toronto
City of Toronto Staff Report October, 2013

Flooding Studies for Areas 18 and 40
Weather Emergencies Public Consultation
Alerts/Streetproofing
Lead in Drinking Water
Important Message to SAHRA Members and Supporters
Toronto Aviation Noise Group Update #5 and #3
Melting Snow and Rain can lead to Basement Flooding
Winter-wise water tips
Toronto Historical Maps Online
Newsletters Prior to 2012

 

**NEW** Avenue Road Bridge
The Avenue Road bridge, besides being a highway entrance/exit, connects North York and North Toronto but the current infrastructure is very unsafe for pedestrians and cyclists.  The City of Toronto’s transportation department has included the bridge in their 10-year cycling plan and as such has engaged the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario over the last three years to provide accommodation for cyclists to no avail.  Cost in the reason offered by the MTO as it falls within their budget.  The bridge is set for reconstruction late 2018 so there is still time to make a change.  Cycle Toronto, SAHRA and FoNTRA have joined the lobbying effort to get MTO’s attention to the matter by sending email letters of support to MTO and Councillor Carmichael Greb.  Their letters are attached.
LettertoHonorableStevenDelDucaMinisterofTransportationAvenueRd-Hwy401BridgeReconstruction
SAHRA Avenue Rd bridge
FoNTRA del duca avenue road and 401 August 2017

 Councillor Carmichael Greb has taken up the cause and has contacted MTO – they are now willing to further discuss modifying the road plan.  The MTO may also be willing to review a new plan from the City. The Councillor’s office is coordinating a meeting with the City Transportation Division and Cycle Toronto in order to develop a proposal which her office will then take to MTO.

This appears to be positive movement.  Additional support from Ward 16 Residents would be most helpful.  Please forward your comments to Councillor Carmichael Greb (councillor_carmichaelgreb@toronto.ca); MPP Mike Colle (mcolle.mpp.co@liberal.ola.org); and Minister Del Duca (sdelduca.mpp.co@liberal.ola.org).

 

**NEW** Toronto Pearson Airport Presentation on concentrated Jetpath Noise

Helios, the UK based consulting firm that has been performing an Independent Toronto Airspace review for NavCanada over the past year, will be making their final, and only, Greater Toronto Area (GTA) presentation to the public on Monday, September 18, 2017 at the Hilton Toronto Airport Hotel & Suites, 5875 Airport Road, Mississauga. http://bit.ly/2uNbgqR

This is a very important presentation regarding our Toronto Pearson Airport concentrated jetpath noise issue.

You must register here to attend https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/independent-toronto-airspace-review-final-presentation-tickets-36459889511

Here is the text of Helios’ invitation:
“Helios, together with Bo Redeborn and Graham Lake, are nearing the end of their Independent Toronto Airspace Review and invite you to attend the final presentation. At the event Nick Boud and Bo Redeborn will present an overview of the recommendations they are making to NAV CANADA to mitigate the impact of aviation noise on the Greater Toronto Area. The event is a public event, open and free to all. We are expecting a large turnout to this event and to be able to make sure the evening runs smoothly we strongly urge you to register your attendance in advance.”

 


SAHRA Information Emails 
(review the Index below for subjects within each email then click on the link to the SAHRA Information Email to review the contents)

**NEW** SAHRA Information – Aug 17, 2017 (NEWS page)
Bill 139
Avenue Road Bridge
Presentation on Toronto Pearson Airport concentrated Jetpath Noise Issue
SAHRA Information Aug 17 2017

**NEW** SAHRA Information – May 14, 2017
The Brookdale (1700 Avenue Road) Construction Management Plan
SAHRA Information – May 14, 2017

**NEW** SAHRA Information – May 7, 2017 
Neighbours’ Night Out – Jun e 13, 2017
Public Meeting: North Toronto Memorial Community Centre Renovations
Graffiti
Environment Days
Doors Open Toronto
Toronto Local Appeal Body (TLAB)
CofA Mediation Project
Donate to the Furniture Bank
SAHRA Information – May 7, 2017

SAHRA Information – April 13, 2017 
SAHRA Annual General Meeting – Election of Directors and Officers
Report for 2016
Thanks to our Volunteers
Avenue Road Avenue Study
Change in timing of Neighbours’ Night Out
Email Address Drive
OOGRA Earth Day Celebration & Park Clean-up
Lytton Park Clean-up Day
Fairlawn’s Annual Book Sale
Rummage Sale at Armour Heights Presbyterian Church
Environment Days
Public Meeting: North Toronto Memorial Community Centre Renovations
North Toronto Group of Artists: Fine Arts Spring Studio Tour
Doors Open Toronto
SAHRA Information – April 13, 2017

SAHRA Information – Mar 29, 2017
250 Lawrence Avenue West
Annual General Meeting
Change in timing of Neighbours’ Night Out
Email Address Drive
Fairlawn’s Annual Book Sale
SAHRA Information – March 29, 2016

SAHRA Information – Mar 27, 2017
Annual General Meeting
Change in timing of Neighbours’ Night Out
Email Address Drive
Fairlawn’s Annual Book Sale
Interested in Volunteering?
Avenue Road Avenue Study Recommendations – Review Report expected on May 2, 2017
Construction at 1678-1704 Avenue Road
378 Fairlawn Avenue re-development
91 Brook – Sub-basement
1560 Avenue Road
250 Lawrence Avenue
Housing Affordability
Ontario’s Greenbelt and Growth Plan
Reminder about the proposed Stormwater Charge
Downspout Disconnection Program
SAHRA Information – March 27, 2017 Word

SAHRA Information – Mar 3, 2017 
About the proposed Stormwater Charge
Toronto Airspace Noise Review – Public Meeting
Email Address Drive
Annual General Meeting
Interested in Volunteering?
Change in timing of Neighbours’ Night Out
Winter Parking Arrangements
Downspout Disconnection Program
SAHRA Information – Mar 3, 2017

SAHRA Information – Feb 27, 2017
Contested Development – The real architect behind T.O.’s tower struggle
250 Lawrence Avenue West – appealed to OMB – hearing on May 25, 2017
1560 Avenue Road – Public Hearing – March 9, 2017
1580 Avenue Road condominium (Beer Store)
Toronto Airspace Noise Review – Public Meeting
Toronto Local Appeal Body (TLAB) Implementation
Email Address Drive
Annual General Meeting
Interested in Volunteering?
Change in timing of Neighbours’ Night Out
Winter Parking Arrangements
Downspout Disconnection Program
SAHRA Information – Feb 27, 2016

SAHRA Information – Feb 12, 2017
Email Address Drive
Annual General Meeting
Interested in Volunteeriing?
Change in timing of Neighbours’ Night Out
Upper Avenue Street Signs
Release of Section 37 monies
Yonge Love: A Ryerson Building Institute Meet-up
Winter Parking Arrangements
Be a Good Neighbour
HonkMobile – Honk = Park, Pay & Go
Downspout Disconnection Program
SAHRA Information – Feb 12, 2017

SAHRA Information – Jan 21, 2017
Old Orchard Park Community Consultation
Email Address Drive
Winter Parking Arrangements
FoNTRA 2016 Year End Report
Armour Heights Community Centre Children’s Program Winter / Spring 2017
Downspout Disconnection Program
SAINTS
SAHRA Information – Jan 21, 2017

SAHRA Information – Oct 17,2016 
2100 Avenue Road
228 Wilson Avenue
1560 Avenue Road at Douglas
4050 Yonge Street
Upper Avenue street signs
Meeting about Armour Heights Public School
The Future of the Greenbelt
Downspout Disconnection Deadline – Dec 31, 2016
The Ugliest side of Toronto’s Ravines
Scuttled Crosstown deal sparks debate about Toronto transit and development
Member Contributions
Neighbours’ Night Out Sep 6, 2016
sahra-information-oct-17-2016

SAHRA Information – Sept 28, 2016 
2100 Avenue Road (Seligman’s at Carmichael)
Basement Flooding & Water Quality Improvements Study
Reimagining Yonge Study Proposes Major Changes in North York
Housing Choices and Prices in the GTA
sahra-information-sep-28-2016

SAHRA Information – Sept 19, 2016
Reminder – Ward Boundary Changes meeting
Basement Flooding & Water Quality Improvements Study meeting
The Brookdale and uncapped laterals
Crowdfunding
Help support the growth of Toronto’s urban forest
sahra-information-sep-19-2016

SAHRA Information – Sept 8, 2016
Armour Heights Community Centre – Children’s Programs Fall 2016|
228 Wilson Avenue – Community Information Meeting
1560 Avenue Road at Douglas
sahra-information-sep-8-2016

SAHRA Information – Aug 28, 2016
Basement Flooding & Water Quality Improvements Study
Ward Boundary Changes
Pusateri’s Fine Foods Updates
Waste Strategy
sahra-information-august-28-2016

SAHRA Information – June 21, 2016
Update on 1780 Avenue Road (SW corner at Melrose – Canada Post)
If you are writing to a City official or organization…
Green-Finger proposal on Brooke Avenue at Avenue Road
SAHRA Information – June 21 2016

SAHRA Information – June 16, 2016
Metrolinx proposal to “clear cut and bulldoze” part of Eglinton Park
SAHRA Information – June 16 2016 Word

SAHRA Information – June 15, 2016
Final Report on Toronto’s long term Waste Management Strategy
SAHRA Information – June 15, 2016

SAHRA Information June 6, 2016
Update on 90 Eglinton Avenue West
Update on Noise By-law
Summer Programs at Armour Heights Community Centre
Update on 1780 Avenue Road (Canada Post Distribution Centre)
Update on 1580 Avenue Road (The Beer Store)
SAHRA Information – June 6, 2016

SAHRA Information – May 15,2016
2100 Avenue Road Community Hearing on May 25, 2016
Community Consultation Meeting Notice May 25 2016 combined

SAHRA Information – May 10, 2016
SAHRA Information – May 10, 2016

SAHRA Information – May 6, 2016 re Toronto’s Noise Bylaw
SAHRA Information – May 6, 2016 Noise

SAHRA Information – April 25, 2016
2100 Avenue Road (Seligman’s)
1780 Avenue Road (SW corner at Melrose – Canada Post)
1580 Avenue Road (SW corner at Bedford – The Beer Store)
1912-1914 Avenue Road (NW corner at Brooke)
Ward 16 Street Speed Limits – It’s Official!
Armour Heights Public School Announcement
Ward 16 Basement Flooding
Sneak Peek – Yonge Park Plaza
The Waiver Process
Payment-in-Lieu of Parking
Waste Strategy Survey
SAHRA Information – April 25, 2016

SAHRA Information – April 10, 2016
SAHRA’s Report for 2015
Armour Heights Presbyterian Legendary Rummage Sale
2016 SAHRA Membership Drive
Waste Strategy Consultation Opportunities
SAHRA Information – April 10 2016

SAHRA Information – March 29, 2016
Spring 2006 Newsletter
Newsletter Spring 2016
SAHRA Annual General Meeting – April 6, 2016
Speed Limits on SAHRA’s Streets
By-law 107-2010
SAHRA Information – March 29, 2016

SAHRA Information – March 14, 2016
Free Movie Screenings in March (Waste Strategy)
SAHRA Annual General Meeting – April 6, 2016
Waste Strategy Public Consultation
SAHRA Information – March 14, 2016

SAHRA Information – March 1, 2016 
By-law 107-2010 Section (f) Amendment
Strategy for Minimizing the Negative Impacts of Residential Infill Construction
SAHRA Information – March 1, 2016

SAHRA Information – Feb 27, 2016
Draft Long Term Waste Management Strategy
SAHRA Information – Feb 27, 2016

SAHRA Information – Feb 21, 2016
SAHRA 1912-1914 Avenue Road Summary Feb, 2016

SAHRA Information – Feb 15, 2016
Seminar “Construction in our Neighbourhood”
2100 Avenue Road re-zoning and development application
SAHRA Annual General Meeting
Study Area 40 Basement Flooding & Water Quality Improvement Study
Review of Noise Bylaw
SAHRA Information – Feb 15, 2016

SAHRA Information – Jan 4, 2016
Important update to Right-of-Entry Bylaw
FoNTRA 2015 Yeear End Report
SAHRA Information – Jan 4, 2016

SAHRA Information –  Nov 10, 2015
Reminder – Important Public Meeting Nov 12 re the Avenue Road Avenue Study Recommendations
SAHRA Information – Nov 10, 2015

SAHRA Information – Nov 8, 2015
OMB Appeal Feb 24, 2016
SAHRA Information – Nov 8, 2015

SAHRA Information – Nov 1, 2015
Important Meeting on Nov 12th
Toronto Waste Strategy Update
SAHRA Information – Nov 1, 2015

SAHRA Information – Oct 1, 2015
Check that you locked your car!
Toronto Ward Boundaries review meetings
SAHRA Information – Oct 1, 2015

SAHRA Information – Sep 24, 2015
Sexual Assault Alert
Armour Heights Community Centre Children’s Fall Programs
Waste Strategy Toronto
Update from the Toronto Aviation Noise Group (Sept 2015)
A great Neighbours’ Night Out on Sept 8th
SAHRA Information – Sept 24, 2015

SAHRA Information – Sep 7, 2015
Reminder …Neighbours’ Night Out
Toronto Ward Boundary Review
SAHRA Information – Sep 7, 2015

SAHRA Information – Sep 1, 2015
Neighbours’ Night Out
Fall Newsletter
1912-1914 Avenue Road
SAHRA Information – Sep 1, 2015

SAHRA Information – Aug 9, 2015
1912-1914 Avenue Road (at Brooke) proposed development
SAHRA Information – Aug 9, 2015

SAHRA Information – Aug 7, 2015
Scam Alert
Break-in Alert
SAHRA Information – Aug 7, 2015

SAHRA Information – July 30 #2, 2015 
2078 Avenue Road status
1912 & 1914 Avenue Road (at Brooke)
250 Lawrence West
Ward 16 Community Park Nights / Looking for Volunteers
Basic Genealogy and Family History Course
Interesting Committee of Adjusment and OMB statistics from 2011
SAHRA’s Neighbours’ Night Out
Comment on Draft Cycling Map before August 1
SAHRA Information – July 30 #2, 2015

SAHRA Information Email – July 30, 2015
Simcoe Day greetings and information provided by Councillor Josh Matlow, Ward 22
SAHRA Information – July 30, 2015

SAHRA Information Email – June 28, 2015
Canada Day Picnic invite from Joe Oliver
Senior Resource/Support Information
SAHRA Information – June 28, 2015

SAHRA Information Email – June 23, 2015
Environment Day on Saturday, June 27 from 10:00 – 2:00
SAHRA Information – June 23, 2015

SAHRA Information Email – June 19, 2015
Councillor Carmichael Greb’s May 25, 2015 Newsletter

SAHRA Information Email – June 16, 2015
Canada Post Community Mailbox
SAHRA Information – June 16 2016 Word

SAHRA Information Email – June 3, 2015
2078 Avenue Road
250 Lawrence Avenue West Community Consultation Meeting
Speed Limits on SAHRA’s Streets
FoNTRA Letter on Bill 73:  Smart Growth for Our Communities Act 2015
Proposed Changes to Policies for Healthy Neighbourhoods, Neighbourhoods and Apartment Neighbourhoods
Waste Strategy
SAHRA Information – June 3, 2015

SAHRA Information Email – May 4, 2015
2078 Avenue Road
Community Consultation Meeting re 2088 Avenue Road
SAHRA Information – May 4, 2015

SAHRA Information Email – May 1, 2015
2078 Avenue Road
SAHRA Information – May 1, 2015

SAHRA Information Email – April 26, 2015
Community Consultation Meeting re 2088 Avenue Road
SAHRA Information – April 26, 2015

Articles:

Reimagining Yonge Study Proposes Major Changes in North York Major upgrades may be coming to the stretch of Yonge Street from Sheppard Avenue north to the Finch Hydro Corridor as the Reimagining Yonge Street study is closing in on a preferred option for the revamp of the major artery. At last week’s Design Review Panel, City officials presented their findings and put forth a proposal to reduce Yonge from six to four lanes between Sheppard and Finch, while adding bike lanes, a landscaped median, wider sidewalks, and cycling and pedestrian infrastructure
http://urbantoronto.ca/news/2016/09/reimagining-yonge-study-proposes-major-changes-north-york


Housing Choices and Prices in the GTA
An interesting article by BILD (Building Industry and Land Development Association) on ‘The inconvenient truth about housing choices and prices in the GTA.
http://bildblogs.ca/housing-realities-in-the-gta/

 

The Future of the Greenbelt
When the Greenbelt Act was introduced 10 years ago, it was about protecting irreplaceable farmland, forests, lakes, rivers, and wetlands from urban sprawl. If these protected lands are lost, they’re lost forever.   The Toronto Environmental Alliance (TEA) email is attached outlining what the development industry has been doing to take control of these irreplaceable Greenbelt lands.

Over 600 requests have come from developers to let urban sprawl into the Greenbelt. Help us send 6,000 requests to the Premier telling her:  “Keep the Greenbelt Off Limits to Urban Sprawl from Developers!” 

The Globe and Mail had a big article in the Globe T.O. section this weekend on this subject as well – ‘The Big Squeeze’.

We have until October 31st when the ten-year review of the Greenbelt legislation comes to a close. You can send the letter prepared by TEA  (Click here to send your letter today.) or use a simpler template that SAHRA has prepared (Future of the Greenbelt attachment).

 

The Ugliest Side of Toronto’s Ravines
Thanks to Debra Satok for following up on this article about how stormwater is ruining our ravines with City officials.  This article demonstrates just how important it is for new developments to embrace the opportunity to keep rainwater on site rather than allowing for storm sewer connections that contravene current bylaws.  In order to build sustainable communities of the future, we need to change the old traditional paradigms and embrace technologies like permeable pavers and bathtub foundations that encourage water absorption at the source.  Increasing lot coverage and dramatically reducing the amount of softscape present in neighbourhoods is counter-productive.
https://www.thestar.com/news/insight/2016/10/15/the-ugliest-side-of-torontos-ravines.html=

 

Scuttled Crosstown deal sparks debate about Toronto transit and development
An interesting article in the Toronto Star about a proposal for a 15-storey building at Avenue Road and Eglinton that would have been built over the new transit station.  Speaks to the petulance of developers and the complexity of working with the community, the City and Metrolinx.
https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2016/10/12/scuttled-crosstown-deal-sparks-debate-about-toronto-transit-and-development.html

Growing Pains documentary
In Growing Pains, a three-part documentary series directed by Gregory Greene, and produced in partnership with Evergreen CityWorks and The Globe and Mail, viewers will explore the decades-spanning planning history that led to the creation of the act. See first-hand the progress city planners and residents across the region have made – and the challenges they’ve faced – and peek at what the near future holds for one of Canada’s fastest-growing regions.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/growing-pains-how-toronto-and-the-gta-are-battling-urban-sprawl/article30506518/

 

Ward Boundary Changes
Update Oct 23, 2016:
The Consultants have submitted a Supplementary Report as of Oct 2016 for review at the Executive Committee on Oct 26th.

http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2016/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-97418.pdf

The original Option 1 (May, 2016) left our Ward as is but for straightening out the border line at Eglinton and Bathurst. But Option 2 (Aug 2016) made drastic changes and cut SAHRA, YMHRA and Bedford Park areas out and repositioned us in the ward area to the east, over to Bayview.

The good news in the Oct 2016 report is that they have returned our Ward back to the Option 1 version! See the following map.

47-wards-recommendation-oct-2016

SAHRA has submitted a Letter of Support for the ‘Recommended Wards with Refinements (47 Wards) to the Executive Committee meeting on Oct 26th in the hope that they will accept this recommendation to put forward to City Council on Nov 8, 2016.


The initial report on Ward Boundary Changes was recommending Option 1 which meant minor changes to our current Ward 16 – the Ward number would be changed to ‘14’; the only boundary change was to straighten out the boundary line to be Eglinton at the far western corner by Bathurst.

Now the City is considering Option 2 which is much more drastic.  SAHRA would be moved into the ward area to the east…it would no longer be part of the original Ward 16 area (which would now be expanded over to the Allen).  SAHRA is not sure that this is a good/logical divide for our Neighbourhood.

We would therefore encourage our Members to participate in the Public Meeting on Sept 19th  7pm-9pm at the North York Civic Centre, Committee Room 1.

Below are details and links:

The Toronto Ward Boundary Review (TWBR) Team is seeking input on additional information requested by the City of Toronto Executive Committee.

There are two ways to provide comments:

During August and September 2016
The TWBR is seeking comments from the public, stakeholders and Members of City Council on two items, which are outlined in the Additional Information Report:

  1. A revised Option 2 (44 wards) that incorporates the refinements suggested during the TWBR public consultation process in August – November 2015; and
  1. A ward option that is consistent with the boundaries of the 25 federal and provincial ridings.

Based on the input received on these two options, a TWBR Supplementary Report will be prepared and submitted to the Executive Committee meeting on October 26, 2016.

At Executive Meeting on May 24, 2016 At its meeting on May 24, 2016, the City of Toronto Executive Committee asked the TWBR Team to provide additional information on a number of issues (read the agenda item history).

The TWBR Team developed this Additional Information Report in response.

Background
In 2014 Toronto City Council launched the TWBR. From July 2014 to February 2015, the TWBR conducted a civic engagement and public consultation process to collect opinions on Toronto’s current ward alignment.

The results informed the development of five options for re-aligning Toronto’s wards. A second round of the TWBR’s civic engagement and public consultation process solicited feedback on these options between August and November 2015.

The TWBR Final Report (May 2016), summarized the TWBR process and recommended a new ward structure.

About the Toronto Ward Boundary Review More information can be found at www.drawthelines.ca.

 

Pusateri’s Fine Foods Update
A Press Release  was issued by First Capital Realty Inc. on August 4, 2016 announcing that they have purchased properties at the corner of Avenue Road and Lawrence.  The sales agreement to First Capital was for $63.2 million and includes the Avenue Road Car Wash, the Carlson Wagonlit building and adjacent apartment building.  The understanding is that Pusteri’s will reopen this fall and will remain on the site as part of the deal.  Information has not been provided as yet as to First Capital’s intentions for redevelopment of the additional properties.

The link below provides information on the redevelopment at Pusateri’s and the design concepts for the renovation.  The store will now feature over 15,000 square feet of redesigned retail and food service space.  New features in-store will include LaCucina, a demonstration area and rotisserie carving station; Greenhouse Juices; Pusateri’s Café, where guests can enjoy specially-made coffee blends and baked goods, as well as for the first time ever a full service restaurant on the premises.

http://www.retail-insider.com/retail-insider/2016/6/pusateris


If you are writing to a City official or organization…
If you are writing your Councillor or other members of the City government about an issue be aware that the correspondence is considered to be a ‘private discussion’ between a member of the public and the City official.  It will not be considered as ‘on public record’ unless you submit a copy to the Secretariat of the appropriate Committee/Council.  Many times it is important that all emails/letters be part of the public record so that all members of the City government are aware of concerns on a particular issue.

For example, if you send an email to your Councillor about an issue going forward to the North York Community Council (i.e. a re-zoning, fence, speed limit, encroachment requests) to be on public record it also has to be sent to the Secretariat for the North York Community Council.

Listed below are five key Councils/Committee along with Secretariat information:

City Council:
City Clerk Marilyn Toft
12th floor, West Tower, City Hall,  100 Queen Street West,  Toronto, ON M5H 2N2
email: clerk@toronto.ca      phone: 416-392-7032  fax: 416-392-2980

North York Community Council
Secretariat Contact Francine Adamo
North York Civic Centre  Main floor, 5100 Yonge St.  Toronto, ON M2N 5V7
email: nycc@toronto.ca  phone: 416-395-0480  fax: 416-395-7337

Licensing and Standards Committee
Secretariat Contact Dela Ting
10th floor, West Tower, City Hall  100 Queen Street West  Toronto, ON M5H 2N2
email: lsc@toronto.ca  phone: 416-397-4592  fax: 416-392-1879

Planning and  Growth Management Committee
Secretariat Contact Nancy Martins
10th floor, West Tower, City Hall,  100 Queen Street West  Toronto, ON M5H 2N2
email: pgmc@toronto.ca  phone: 416-397-4579  fax: 416-392-1879

Executive Committee
Secretariat Contact Jennifer Forkes
10th floor, West Tower, City Hall  100 Queen Street West  Toronto, ON M5H 2N2
email: exc@toronto.ca  phone: 416-392-4666  fax: 416-392-1879

Public Works & Infrastructure Committee
Secretariat Contact Dela Ting
10th floor, West Tower, City Hall  100 Queen Street West  Toronto, ON M5H 2N2
email: exc@toronto.ca  phone: 416-392-4592  fax: 416-392-1879

 

Final Report on City of Toronto Long Term Waste Management Strategy
Update…
The final Waste Strategy is now complete and was considered by the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee (PWIC) at their meeting on Monday June 20, 2016 and City Council at their meeting of July 12-14, 2016.

The report can be viewed online including attachments with the Final Waste Strategy document and Public Consultation Report: http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2016.PW14.2

Final Waste Strategy Report notice June 13 2016
Final Long Term Waste Management Strategy
Draft Long Term Waste Management Strategy
A staff report on the Long Term Waste Management Strategy will be presented to the City of Toronto’s Public Works and Infrastucture Committee on Tuesday, March 1, 2016 (third item on the agenda).  Public Consultation will take place in the Spring 2016.

SAHRA Information – Feb 27, 2016

Noise Bylaw Review
Update – June 6, 2016
On May 2, 2016 we reported that SAHRA supports the efforts of FoNTRA, CORRA, Residents’ Associations and residents across the City who are concerned about Toronto’s proposed Noise Bylaw.  SAHRA submittd a letter of concern to the Mayor, our Councillor, the Municipal Licensing and Standards Committee and the Medical Officer of Health.  We also encouraged our Members to take Action. We need to work together for a strong noise bylaw to protect our peace and quiet. 

Amendments to the Noise By-law were considered by the Licensing and Standards Committee on May 19, 2016 with the intention that it would go to City Council for approval on June 7, 2016.

We are pleased to report (with the assistance of Councillor Josh Matlow) that the item was Deferred to allow time for further review by City officials, the Toronto Noise Coalition, Residents’ Associations, entertainment and construction associations, BIA’s and other relevant stakeholders with reporting back to the Licensing and Standards Committee on Sept 21, 2016.

Update – May 19, 2016 LSC Hearing
The Toronto Noise Coalition’s press release was released this past Wednesday; also the August 28, 2015 Health briefing note.
Toronto Noise Coalition
Noise Toronto Public Health Aug _16 Report

It is absolutely crucial that the residents write Councillor Carmichael Greb, Mayor Tory, the ML&S Committee and Dr. David McKeown, Toronto’s Medial Office of Health to improve the revisions and attend the ML&S committee hearing on May 19th at City Hall to express their concerns.

David McKeown (medicalofficerofhealth@toronto.ca)
ML&S Committee members (lsc@toronto.ca)
Mayor Tory (mayor_tory@toronto.ca)

The construction and music industries have been very effective pressing ML&S to relax noise regulations and enforcement. Furthermore there is pressure to push the revisions through prematurely to enable the City’s music strategy. Toronto Public Health has “begun the review of the most current evidence of the impacts of noise on health” which will be released after the noise by-law will have been enacted when it will be too late. We need to point this out to Torontonians.

Here are the statistics analysed from Municipal Licencing & Standards, Staff Report LS9.1 January 11, 2016:

Year Noise Complaints % Increase since 2011
2011 3273 N/A
2012 4139 26%
2013 5442 66%
2104 6477 98%
2015 9037 176%

Please forward an email to the officials stating your views.

From: Sahra Toronto [mailto:sahratoronto@rogers.com] Sent: Monday, May 02, 2016 4:47 PM Subject: SAHRA Information – May 2, 2016

SAHRA supports the efforts of FoNTRA, CORRA, Residents’ Associations and residents across the City who are concerned about Toronto’s proposed Noise Bylaw.  SAHRA will submit a letter of concern to the Mayor, our Councillor, the Municipal Licensing and Standards Committee and the Medical Officer of Health.  We also encourage our Members to take Action. We need to work together for a strong noise bylaw to protect our peace and quiet.

 

NOISE ALERTHELP IMPROVE TORONTO’S NOISE BYLAW!

The threat to a strong noise bylaw that protects the health of residents continues.

Toronto’s Noise bylaw needs to address your concerns. 82.5% of respondents to the City’s April 2015 noise consultation indicated noise problems in their Ward. The most common noise impacts, in addition to general disturbance, were sleep loss/insomnia and stress.

The current proposal should be unacceptable to every Toronto resident.  It removes daytime protection for all types of noise (the General Provision that provides a right to peace and quiet) and has unenforceable requirements for amplified sound, day and night (decibel measurements by bylaw officers).

This issue will be brought forward at a May 19th Hearing at City Hall.  The commercial music and construction industries have been meeting privately with Municipal Licensing and Standards (MLS) for a number of months, with the support of the City’s Economic and Development Staff.  Their voices are being heard.  It is expected that commercial music and construction industries will be at the May 19th meeting to put their interests forward.

Below is information prepared by a working group within FoNTRA (Federation of North Toronto Ratepayers Associations) which outlines the problems with the current revision as well as “A 7-Point Plan” for an effective bylaw.

We must make our voices heard too, loud and clear.  We need your views to be made known to the Mayor, our Councillor, Municipal Licensing Standards and the Toronto Medical Officer of Health.

TAKE ACTION NOW

Attend the May 19 Hearing at City Hall and voice your opinion. Toronto’s noise bylaw must reflect the City’s changing landscape and advances in acoustic technology.  New York City’s Noise Code shows it is possible and necessary to support the 24/7 business and entertainment life of a truly great city while enacting and enforcing effective noise regulations to reduce unwanted and harmful sound. Toronto needs to follow New York City’s example.

FoNTRA Outline:
City Hall’s proposed noise by-law revisions ignore Torontonians’ concerns. Judging from City Staff’s January recommendations they have:
• Removed existing noise bylaw safeguards
• Weakened noise protection provisions, and
• Weakened protection of Torontonians’ health and quality of life.

Problems if the Noise bylaw is not improved:

Why is the City not listening to Toronto Public Health’s August 28, 2015 memo stating:

“While noise has typically been controlled to address quality of life issues and noise-induced hearing loss, there is evidence that exposure to noise also has impacts on health at levels be-low which impacts on hearing acuity occur. These adverse health effects could occur at levels below 50 dBA. 

A quality outdoor environment can support more active living (more walking or cycling, or active recreation). Limiting average outdoor noise levels to below 55 dBA (daytime) is therefore desirable for health.

Keeping levels of noise below the provincial Environmental Noise Guideline (NPC-300) is desirable as sleep disturbance has been shown to occur at levels as low as 32 dBA”.

A 7-POINT PLAN 

  1. Declaration of Policy  Like New York City, clearly state the Noise By-law’s purpose is protecting Torontonians’ health and quality of life.
  2. General Provision Retain the General Provision for 24/7 protection from vibrations and sound of such a volume or nature that it is likely to disturb City inhabitants.
  3. Amplified Sound  Replace, improve and enforce the specific prohibition of amplified noise projected beyond a property line onto streets or public places including City parks for loud-speakers and other problematic noise sources such as leaf blowers and motorcycles.
  4. Construction  Toronto will be “under construction” for years. Follow New York City’s regulations. Examples:  • Require Noise Mitigation Plans for all construction work. • Prohibit construction except for owner-occupied homes on weekends and statutory holidays from May to October.
  5. Mechanical Equipment  Include standards and regulate disruptive noise from HVAC equipment and compressors.
  6. Exceptions  Must be considered a privilege not a right and restrict hours and amplified sound levels.
  1. Enforcement  City Council must increase investment for effective and timely enforcement 24/7 and authorize police and by-law enforcement officers to issue summonses, tickets and notices for Noise By-law violations.

Review Initiated
The City of Toronto Municipal Licensing and Standards Division has undertaken a review of the City’s Noise Bylaw, which provides standards for noise and applies to all properties in Toronto. The bylaw exists to prevent noise that is likely to disturb residents’ enjoyment and comfort. The goal of the review is to create a noise bylaw that balances the interests of all stakeholders, is up-to-date and easy for residents, property owners and businesses to understand.

Key recommendations include:
• specific time periods when noise is prohibited
• limits for amplified sound
• proactive noise mitigation requirements
• increased fines and penalties
• removal of automatic exemptions for pouring of concrete and large crane work

Staff will present the changes being considered at a consultation session on Wednesday, February 17 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Toronto City Hall in Committee Room 1. More information about the review and current regulations can be found at http://www.toronto.ca/mlshaveyoursay. Staff will report to the Licensing and Standards Committee on Tuesday, March 8 with recommended bylaw changes.

90 Eglinton Avenue West (24 storey building in a Mid-Rise building area)
A Community Meeting was held on May 11, 2016 to review the proposal from Madison to build a 24-storey tower at the corner of Eglinton and Henning.  The height goes well beyond the City zoning allocation for a midrise building.  Based on the width of Eglinton Avenue, the maximum number of floors permitted is 7.  The community made their opposition to this proposal very clear.  Councillor Carmichael Greb stated in her recent Newsletter that she supports the position of the community and she looks forward to seeing the City Planning report for the revised application. 

The developer has now purchased residential properties at 17 and 19 Henning Avenue.  The North York Community Council has authorized another Community Consultation Meeting to be held to review an application for an Official Plan Amendment application for these properties from Neighbourhoods designation to Mixed Use Areas.  We will advise as soon as a meeting date is set.

 

Newsletters:

Newsletter Spring 2016
SAHRA Annual General Meeting – April 6, 2016
Neighbours’ Night Out Thank You!
Avenue Road Avenue Study
By-law 107-2010
2078 Avenue Road
1912-1914 Avenue Road
2088 Avenue Road
250 Lawrence Avenue West
2100 Avenue Road
2016 SAHRA Membership Drive

Newsletter Fall 2015
Neighbours’ Night Out Sept 8, 2015
1912-1914 Avenue Road (at Brooke)
2078 Avenue Road (at Joicey)
2088 Avenue Road (at Joicey)
250 Lawrence Avenue West
Speed Limits
Rodent Control

Newsletter Winter 2015
Basement Flooding / Downspout Disconnection Program
Chimney Issue
Issues Reviewing with Councillor

Newsletter Sept 2014

Newsletter Spring 2014
Get Emergency Ready
Right-of-Entry Permit

Newsletter Winter 2014
Chimney Issue
200 Ridley Blvd
Basement Flooding Protection Subsidy

Newsletter Winter 2014 Insert
Tips for Dealing with the Developer on the Construction of a New House

Newsletter Sept 2013 B

Newsletter Spring 2013
About the Canadian Forces College

Newsletter Winter 2013
Useful Guide to North York Committee of Adjustment
Dealing with CofA Applications
The Avenue Road Study

Newsletter Winter 2013 Security Insert
Focusing on Security

Guide to the North York CofA
C of A Guide_1

Newsletter Aug 2012

Newsletter April 2012
Alleyway Improvements
Graffiti

Newsletter March 2012

Newsletter Winter 2012
The $10K Chimney Surprise!


Rodent Control
Members are reporting increasing incidents of rat problems. Large urban environments provide excellent habitats for rats to survive and thrive but none of us want them on our property. Go to the City of Toronto website for info or call 416-338-7600. http://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/contentonly?vgnextoid=2b205ce6dfb31410VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD

If you have an infestation, it is recommended that you hire a professional to set out bait. You can find providers on the Internet. GTA Wildlife Removal & Pest Control Ltd. (www.gtapestcontrol.ca) has worked in our area and will give a discounted pkg (2 bait stations and a full 6 month warranty) for $200 to SAHRA members. Contact Kevin Diamond at 416-896-6883 and tell him you live in the SAHRA area.


Proposed Yonge-401 Bypass Trail:

A Multi-Use Path bypassing the Yonge-401 Interchange

The Yonge Street Working Group is a Cycle Toronto committee advocating for cycling infrastructure improvements along the Yonge Street corridor. The Yonge-401 Bypass Trail is based on an original conceptual idea by Raymond Jean.

The Challenge:
Along Yonge Street, the dense North York Centre area and Midtown Toronto are separated by the busy Yonge-401 interchange and the deep ravine valley of the West Don River. At this point, Yonge St. is a formidable 3-km barrier for pedestrians, cyclists and mobility device users.  Few cyclists and fewer mobility device users attempt the crossing due to the steep hills at either end, the high roadway speeds and disconnections in safe pedestrian infrastructure.

The Proposed Solution:
We propose that a multi-use trail — the Yonge-401 Bypass Trail — be included within the environmental assessment of the Yonge-401 interchange redesign, using the undercarriage of the Highway 401 bridge to support a new trail, connecting through to the existing service road underpasses under the 401 to the surrounding street network. To complete the network, we also propose the construction of a trail along the west side of Yonge from the 401 down to York Mills, with a tunnel connecting the St. Andrew’s neighbourhood.

[access the link below to view a conceptual picture of the path under the bridge] 

Each of the four independent bridges of Highway 401 are perfectly flat, linking the ridge of one side of the Don River Valley West to the other.  Directly below the upper decks of these bridges, there is underutilized space and available structure which could support an elevated multi-use trail. Trail users would be able to cross the Don River Valley West without a significant change in elevation.

The north-south underpasses at either end of the bridges would allow a north-south crossing of Highway 401, completely separated from auto traffic, and would serve as trail junctions. In this report they are named the East Underpass Junction and West Underpass Junction.  Each end of the underpasses would have a multi-use trail linking to the communities at the ridge facilitating ridge height access between all communities around the Yonge-401-Hoggs Hollow area.  There could also be trails to the valley bottom linking existing trail systems in Earl Bales Park and the Hoggs Hollow community.

[access the link below to view a map of the path and all the connections]

The East Junction Underpass would connect to trails leading to the:

The West Junction Underpass will connect to trails leading to the:

Next Steps:

Benefits to the city are considerable:

This document can be accessed on the Internet at: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LLVjVU_j4Bu6KloIPNGKeLzIz9Bke74GG2zLsGe6SWg/edit

A You Tube explanation of the proposal can be viewed at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UhPvI1j9XbU

Toronto’s Tree Canopy

Tree For Me: Offering free, native trees to Toronto Residents
It is estimated that Toronto’s current tree coverage sits somewhere between 26% and 28%. A study conducted by the USDA suggests that a sustainable, healthy urban forest for Toronto would require us to increase our canopy coverage to 40%.  Tree For Me working to increase plantings on private land where 60% of the current and potential canopy rests by matching residents with a free native tree.

How it works:

To learn more visit TreeForMe.ca or Toronto Parks and Trees Foundation
For the USDA report, please visit “Every Tree Counts: A Portrait of Toronto’s Urban Forest”

 

Flooding

 

Update Oct, 2016:
A reminder that the deadline is fast approaching in our area for disconnecting downspouts.  Here is a link to City information on the program.
http://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/contentonly?vgnextoid=d490ba32db7ce310VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD

 


Update Sept 28, 2016:

Basement Flooding & Water Quality Improvements Study
A number of representatives from Ward 16 Residents’ Associations (SAHRA, OOGRA, LPRO, EGRA) were present at the September 27th Public Information Centre to learn about different options being considered to reduce flooding in Study Area 40.  Debra Satok has submitted a summary of Key Issues to the City Officials from a Ward 16 perspective:

  1.  Redevelopment of Avenue Road between Wilson and Lawrence, as well as the Eglinton Corridor
  2. Uncapped Laterals
  3. 250 Lawrence Avenue West
  4. Infiltration Rates
  5. $32,000 Per Benefiting Property Threshold
  6. Downspout Disconnection

Update August 28, 2016:
The good news is that a Master Plan Class Environmental Assessment (EA) study is now underway to determine the contributing factors for surface and basement flooding in Study Area 40 (which includes the SAHRA area).  The study will recommend solutions to improve the City’s sewer system and overland drainage routes in order to mitigate flooding problems.  This study will also aim to improve the quality of stormwater runoff before it is discharged to watercourses.

You’re invited to the first Public Information Centre (PIC) to learn about factors contributing to surface and basement flooding and the different options being considered to reduce flooding in Study Area 40.  You will have an opportunity to review display boards and speak one-on-one with project staff.

Date:     Tuesday, September 27, 2016
Time:     6:00 pm to 8:00 pm
Place:    North Toronto Memorial Community Centre, 200 Eglinton Ave West (at Avenue Road)

Area Study Area 40 Basement Flooding & Water Quality Improvements Study
Study Newsletter #1 has recently been delivered to houses within Study Area 40 (generally Highway 401 down to just above St. Clair and from Bayview over to Bathurst). SAHRA boundaries are within Study Area 40.  The Study is also being advertised in local papers such as The Mirror on Jan 28, 2016.

The Study Process will consist of four phases – Data Collection, Identify Problem + Opportunities (expected to be completed by Fall 2016) and then Evaluate Alternative Solutions (by 2017) and then Select Preferred Solutions.

Two Public Information Centres are planned – the first to take place in late 2016.

The City is asking residents to take part in a short online survey: http://tinyurl.com/qbw5uuv

Visit the project website for more information or contact the City if you want to be placed on the mailing list for updates.

Email: rmlee@toronto.ca

Website: Toronto.ca/bfea

Flooding Issue: Request for a By-law change to require permanent capping of old sewer laterals prior to Demolition
Our area suffered basement flooding in August, 1986, May, 2000, July, 2002, August, 2005 and July, 2013. As Residents’ Associations, both SAHRA and the Old Orchard Grove Residents’ Association have been concerned about defining causes and finding solutions to prevent future occurrences. Debra Satok has done extensive research on this issue and a potential source of flooding are uncapped sewer laterals.

When a home/building in Toronto is demolished, the existing sanitary and storm sewer laterals (the pipes leading to the main street sewer) are disconnected and simply left open during the remainder of the demolition and subsequent construction.  When the new building is close to completion and ready for the connection of the new sanitary and storm sewers, contractors are hired by the city to install new sanitary and storm sewer laterals, as well as find, and permanently cap, the old ones.  Often contractors are unable to locate the old sewer laterals so they remain open; permanently uncapped.

Uncapped sanitary and storm laterals allow ground water to enter the sewer system, putting additional strain on the sewer shed, overwhelming the treatment plants and costing tax-payers for unnecessary water treatment.  It also leads to basement flooding as the sewer system was not designed to handle this volume of the excessive infiltration.  Even more alarming, during heavy rains, when the sanitary sewers surcharges, sewer wastewater can flood out through the openings of the uncapped sanitary laterals sending overflowing sanitary sewage under our homes. Weeping tile systems will collect this contaminated wastewater, and sump pumps will discharge it to the homes’ lawn.

Many, if not most other municipalities have by-laws requiring capping of the laterals prior to demolition. The Canadian Common Ground Alliance recommends capping of the laterals as part of their “best practices”.The current Municipal Code 681-11 C  (http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/municode/1184_681.pdf) currently states: that “The owner or owner’s agent shall apply to the City for a new municipal sewer connection or installations and, where necessary, for the disconnection of the existing municipal sewer connections, and pay to the City the cost of such work on an actual cost basis with a minimum charge equal to the applicable flat rate for such works, as determined by the City from time to time, where there is… (2) A construction of a new or reconstructed building”. The By-law does not indicate any requirements for capping prior to demolition. The current disconnection fee charged to homeowners /builders is $1300.00.

It is recommend that Toronto put in place a policy similar to Port Colborne, Ontario and Delta, B.C. whereby demolition permits are only granted once a signed declaration of severance from the various services has been received ).

FoNTRA , SAHRA, OOGRA and LPRO are in support of this initiative. While this is a city-wide issue, we have asked Councillor Carmichael-Greb to champion it and table a motion at the September meeting of the Planning and Growth Management Committee and/or the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee to ask the Staff to do a review to determine if and when the current Municipal Code 681-11 could be modified to define that demolition permits are only granted once a declaration of severance from various services has been received; asking that a Staff Report be presented to the committee(s) on their findings by Quarter 4 of 2016; followed by presentation to City Council for formal approval.

SAHRA supporting request letter July 4, 2016 –   SAHRA request re Capping old sewer laterals

Basement Flooding / The Downspout Disconnection Program
(Thanks to D. Satok for her research which we have used in this article)
Reocurring basement flooding has plagued Toronto over the last two decades. The problem has intensified due to changing weather patterns, infill construction, an aging sewer system and more elaborately finished basements.

Flooding can occur from seepage or flow through the basement walls or foundation floor, from surface water sources like driveways, or by a Sanitary or Storm Sewer backup. Basements are the lowest level of a building, typically built below ground level. During spring melts and heavy rainstorms, the groundwater level can be above the level of the basement floor. In some locations where the water table is particularly high, groundwater can be above the level of the floor at all times. Sewers are also located in the ground. This includes all varieties – Storm, Sanitary and combined. While in most cases, sewers are below the level of the basement, the water level in the sewers can be, at times, above the level of the basement floor.

Gravity does its best to move water from high to low as it follows the path of least resistance. If either the groundwater level or sewer level around a home is above the basement floor, gravity will try to move that water into the basement.  A crack in the foundation floor, for example, provides gravity with a perfect path for water to be pushed into the basement. There are many reasons a basement can flood including sewer backup, seepage, weeping tile failure, sump pump failure and reverse driveway infiltration.

 

flooding

Sanitary Sewers always have a path to the home, by design, and it is called the Sanitary Sewer lateral. While under normal conditions, the lateral allows wastewater to flow away from a home to the sewer; there is the potential for water to move backwards from the sewer toward an individual home. During heavy storms, infiltration of ground water can cause the Sanitary Sewers to be full and the sewage level may rise above the top of the pipe and above that of some basements. When this occurs, the wastewater may enter basements through basement floor drains, sinks and toilets. Sanitary Sewers were not designed for excessive groundwater, as they are usually at least half the diameter of Storm Sewers. However, during heavy rains groundwater can come from leaks in sewer-mains and sewer laterals, inflow from manhole covers as well as illegally-connected, private-side sources including foundation drains, sump pumps and downspouts.

Following severe flooding in August 2005, The City of Toronto engaged the services of Stantec Consultants to evaluate the causes and make recommendations for basement flooding in 34 areas of Toronto that have been subject to chronic flooding. The Study of Area 18 (Highway 401 to Lawrence Avenue, Avenue Road to the Allen Expressway) was completed in 2014. The estimated cost of implementation for this area is $107.8 million dollars.

On July 8, 2013, severe thunderstorms and heavy rains flooded many parts of the City.  More than 4,700 basement flooding complaints were received by the City.  Many of the impacted properties were located outside of the existing Basement Flooding Protection Program’s 34 priority study areas resulting in the need to reconsider how basement flooding risks are assessed and addressed city wide. In Oct, 2013, the City expanded the program to include 7 additional areas to be assessed starting in 2014 and 2015.

The Environmental Assessment (EA) for Area 40, which encompasses the SAHRA area, should begin in 2015.

The EA will take 2 years to complete…the result of this phase is a Study Report (with recommendations) in late 2016.  Public meetings will then take place. The study would then be sequenced in the 5 year project list for the next step which is a 2 year engineering design period before construction would commence.  2017 (if slotted in the project list) plus 2 years (design) plus 1 to 3 years of construction would call for completion between 2020 to 2022.

In the interim, the City of Toronto has implemented a number of programs designed to protect homeowners and limit damage. A Downspout Disconnection initiative has been in place for several years. It is being implemented across the city in three phases….the SAHRA area is within Phase 3 which has a deadline date of December 3, 2016.  However, the sooner homes are disconnected from the sewer system, the less strain on the system and therefore less flooding.  Stantec estimates that this type of source control would cause a 10% reduction in annual volume.  The City of Toronto website includes information on the Benefits, Frequently Asked Questions, Do-It-Yourself Instructions, Tips as well as the Exemption Application process.

http://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/contentonly?vgnextoid=d490ba32db7ce310VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD

Further information on by-laws within Toronto’s Municipal Code, Chapter 681 is contained in the following document:

Downspouts By-law Information

Rebates of up $3400 per household for a portion of the cost of installation of sump pumps, back flow valves and downspout disconnections are available. Awareness programs designed to educate homeowners regarding grading and home maintenance are also in place. Some Bylaw and Building Code changes have been executed in an attempt to design more weatherproof homes that are less taxing on the current infrastructure.  See information on the Rebate Program in an article below.

Though programs like these are positive, without change it is apparent that the aging and now inadequate design of Toronto’s sewer system will continue to place many homes in harms way each and every time it rains. It is clear that infrastructure upgrades and redesign are imperative to prevent flooding.

Typical Causes of Basement Flooding diagram:

Basement Flooding Typical Causes diagram

Basement Flooding Protection Subsidy Program, City of Toronto 

Help protect yourself against basement flooding
Basements can flood for many reasons. While the City of Toronto is working to make improvements to its complex system of underground pipes, sewers and catchbasins, these improvements alone cannot completely protect a home from basement flooding. With the increasingly frequent and severe weather, it is essential that homeowners take the appropriate action to reduce the risk of basement flooding on their own private property. Those who isolate their home from the City’s sewer system can significantly reduce the risk of basement flooding.

To assist homeowners, the City offers owners of single-family, duplex and triplex residential homes a financial subsidy of up to $3,200 per property to install flood protection devices including a backwater valve, a sump pump, and pipe severance and capping of the home’s storm sewer or external weeping tile connection.

Work that is eligible
Each property owner is required to have a Plumbing Contractor, licenced by the city of Toronto, carry out a site assessment to determine the suitability of isolating their property from the City’s sewer system. Contact Municipal Licensing & Standards at 416-392-6700 to verify that your contractor has the appropriate City of Toronto plumbing licenses. The following items and works are eligible for a subsidy after proper installation:

A: Backwater valve
In consultation with a Plumbing Contractor or Drain Contractor licensed by the City of Toronto, homeowners may determine that a backwater valve on the sanitary sewage and/or stormwater connection could provide sufficient basement flooding protection.

Available subsidy = 80% of the invoiced cost up to a maximum of $1,250 including eligible labour, materials, permit and taxes.

B: Sump pump
In consultation with a Plumber Contractor and/or a Building Renovator with an endorsement for concrete work licensed by the City of Toronto, homeowners may determine that a sump pump is required to manage the water normally collected by footing weeping tiles that drain to the sanitary, storm or combined sewer.

Available subsidy = 80% of the invoiced cost up to a maximum of $1,750 including labour, materials and taxes.

C: Backwater valve + sump pump
Homeowners may determine that both a backwater valve and a sump pump are required (see details in previous section A and B). Available subsidy = 80% of the invoiced cost up to a maximum of $2,800 including eligible labour, materials, permit and taxes.

Backwater valves and sump pumps need to be inspected and maintained to ensure optimal performance.

D: Pipe severance and capping
In consultation with a Plumber Contractor or Drain Contractor licensed by the City of Toronto, homeowners may determine that disconnecting foundation drains (weeping tiles) from the City’s sewer system by severing and capping the underground storm sewer connection pipe is also required to protect the home from basement flooding.

Available subsidy = 80% of the invoiced cost up to a maximum of $400 including eligible labour, materials and taxes.

When you are applying for more than one item under the subsidy program, you cannot apply any unused funds from one item to another.

Eligibility requirements and information
The City of Toronto will determine the eligibility of properties that meet the requirements listed below:

How to apply for a subsidy
Step 1
Consult with a plumber licensed by the City of Toronto for an assessment and recommendation of the appropriate installation(s) that will isolate your property from the City’s sewer system. More information on plumbing/contractor license information.

The following steps are applicable for backwater valve installations only.

If you plan on having a backwater valve installed on your property, you or your plumber must first:

Toronto and East York District
Toronto City Hall
100 Queen Street West
416-392-7539
Wards: 14, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32

North York District
North York Civic Centre
5100 Yonge Street
416-395-7000
Wards: 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 24, 25, 26, 33, 34

Step 2
After the flooding protection work has been completed, obtain an itemized invoice marked “paid in full” from your City of Toronto-licensed plumber or contractor.

Step 3
Complete the Basement Flooding Protection Subsidy Program application form

Step 4
Mail the completed application form with all the required documentation to:
Basement Flooding Protection Subsidy Program
City of Toronto
PO Box 15266 STN BRM B
Toronto, ON  M7Y 2W1

Step 5
City staff will then review your application and determine if you are eligible for a subsidy.

Step 6
If your application is incomplete or you have not included the proper documentation, it will not be processed and all documents will be returned to you. If your application is denied, you will be notified by mail.

Download the Basement Flooding Protection Subsidy application form.

City of Toronto Staff Report October, 2013

This Staff Report advised City Council on the expansion of the Basement Flooding Protection Program city wide, to include new study areas, including the budget impacts and the prioritization methodology for new areas.  New study areas are recommended for initiation in 2014 and 2015 and for completion in 2016 and 2017. This report also addresses the question of “How fast can studies be completed?”

Flooding basement protection program- staff report

 

Flooding Studies for Areas 18 and 40
(Thanks to SAHRA Member MC Russell for summarizing City information for this article)

A plan for Basement Flooding Protection work was approved by Council in 2006.  In accordance with the requirements of the Province of Ontario’s Environmental Assessment Act, a Class Environmental Assessment study must be completed that includes the evaluation of alternative solutions and consultation with affected stakeholders before any work can be implemented in a given area.

At this time 32 study areas have been identified, each representing a sanitary sewer drainage area serviced by underground sewer networks.

Flooding EA Map by Ward.pdf

This updated map was published by the City as of April, 2015:

Flooding EA Map by Ward Apr 2015

A very detailed engineering assessment is required, typically over a two year period, to identify the most efficient and preferred solution.  The solutions are neighbourhood specific and consider local factors such as the topography of the area, sewer system design and function, drainage associated with individual lots and the road network.

Construction of storm drainage and sewer improvement works began in 2009 and will continue for years to come.  So far $32.8 million has been spent on 4.2 km of sewer upgrades benefitting 2840 properties at high risk of flooding.  Construction of a big project of retrofitting an above ground stormwater tank (at the Wastewater Treatment Plant, North York), is on hold pending the Coxwell emergency bypass completion.

Flooding Areas 18 and 40.JPG

The Area 18 study of the area from Avenue over the Bathurst/Allen started in November, 2011 is nearing completion and a project file will be released to the community in the local library for a 30 day review (the release date will be in the local paper).  The recommended solutions for Area 18 include (a) new storm sewers (b) storm sewer upgrades (c) underground storage pipes and (d) storage tank pumping.  Once the study is completed, the recommended infrastructure improvement projects are sequenced into a 5-year project list, which is presented annually to City Council, to undergo engineering design and construction.  Engineering design in Area 18 could begin as early as 2015 and this typically takes two years to complete, followed by construction.  As all projects cannot be implemented at the same time, projects are prioritized as per Council approved criteria to protect the greatest number of properties as soon as possible, within approved budgets and coordinated with other construction work.  2015 plus 2 years (design) plus 1 to 3 years of construction would call for completion between 2018 to 2020.

Flooding A18 Recommendations.pdf

The City has now published a final, detailed version of the A18 Recommendations including costing details ($1,484,000).

Area 18 Final Solutions

The Area 40 (the SAHRA area) study will begin in 2015 and take 2 years to complete.  A Study Report (with recommendations) would be expected to be issued in late 2016.  Public meetings will take place when the study is initiated and at various stages of the process.  The study would then follow the process outlined above for sequencing in the 5-year project list and eventually a 2 year engineering design period before construction would commence.  2017 plus 2 years (design) plus 1 to 3 years of construction would call for completion between 2020 to 2022.

In the interim, the City of Toronto is strongly advocating/advertising that it is essential that homeowners take the appropriate action to reduce the risk of basement flooding on their own private property.  They state “Those who isolate their home from the City’s sewer system can significantly reduce the risk of basement flooding.”

To assist homeowners, the City offers owners of single-family, duplex and triplex residential homes a financial subsidy of up to $3,400 per property to install flood protection devices including:

(a)   Backwater valve
(b)   Sump pump
(c)   Pipe severance and capping

Further information on the program and the Application are available via this link:

2014 Flood Protection brochure_and_app.pdf

This article with embedded hyperlinks is available here:
Flooding Studies for Areas 18 and 40

 

Weather Emergencies Public Consultation

The City of Toronto has sought out public input on the City’s response to the July 2013 flood and the December 2013 ice storm.  From May 9 to May 30, 2014 residents were invited to tell the City what worked well in their neighbourhoods, what needs improving and how the City can support its residents in future weather emergencies.

The City scheduled four public information and consultation sessions at City civic centres and launched a consultation website.  All residents, whether they attended the public sessions or not, were encouraged to fill out an online feedback form on the consultation website.  The website also included background reports, emergency preparedness resources and further information on how the public could provide input.

The City Manager was to report back to the City’s Executive Committee on July 2 on the outcomes of storm-related reviews undertaken by the City and Toronto Hydro, and this public consultation.  Public input was posted on the consultation website and the City’s Open Data website.

Reports/materials/manuals related to this issue:

Impacts from the December 2013 Extreme Winter Storm Event on the City of Toronto:
Go to http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2014.CC46.1

City of Toronto Public Consultation on Emergency Weather Consultation Report June 18, 2014:
Weatherproof Toronto Consultation Report – 21 June 2014

Emergency Weather Preparedness Report July 8, 2014:
Go to http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2014.EX43.3

The City of Toronto Office of Emergency Management has prepared a pamphlet  ‘Get Emergency Ready’  with helpful information, instructions, tips, checklists and forms. You can download it from:
http://www1.toronto.ca/city_of_toronto/office_of_emergency_management/files/pdf/oem_booklet.pdf

You can also obtain the ‘Personal Preparedness Guide’ on the Office of Emergency Management website www.toronto.ca/oem.

Also access the Toronto Hydro website for the ‘Are You Ready’ guide.

 

Alerts / Streetproofing
The Toronto Police streetproofing program encourages you to teach your child:
1. His/her name, address, phone number
2. To Dial 9-1-1 in an emergency
3. To communicate with you when they feel unsafe or afraid
4. To keep you informed as to his/her whereabouts at all times
5. Never to admit to being alone in the home when answering the telephone
6. Never to invite strangers into the house or answer the door when alone
7. Never to approach or enter a stranger’s car or hitchhike
8. Never to travel or play alone- always be with friends
9. To trust their feelings and say “NO” to an adult if that adult wants them to do something that is wrong
10. Not to accept gifts from strangers
11. To tell you if someone has asked them to keep a secret from you
12. That no one has the right to touch any part of his/ her body that a bathing suit would cover
13. That if he/ she is being followed, or approached too closely, to run home or go to the nearest public place and yell for help
14. To report to your school authorities or a police officer, anyone who act suspiciously towards him/ her
15. Never to play in deserted buildings or isolated areas
16. Never to enter anyone’s home without your permission
17. To avoid taking shortcuts through parks and fields
18. Never to show his/her money and if attacked to give it up rather than risk injury
19. That a police officer is a friend who can always be relied upon when he/ she is lost or needs assistance

Lead in Drinking Water
T
here was a story published by the Toronto Star regarding lead in drinking water. The Toronto Water staff say that lead does not exist in Toronto’s source water, Lake Ontario or in the City’s drinking water distribution system. Rather, lead is a concern for homes built before the mid-1950s when residential water service pipes were commonly made of lead. As these pipes corrode or break down, lead can enter drinking water.

If you live in a home built before the mid-1950s, the City offers free lead testing. You can call 311 to pre-register for a water testing kit. For more information, please visit the Toronto Water website

Toronto Aviation Noise Group Update #5 February, 2015
WHO ARE WE?  A broad consensus of residents and multiple ratepayer association from midtown Toronto neighbourhoods negatively affected by the highly concentrated arrivals route at Pearson International Airport. The new flight path was unfairly implemented in February 2012 by Nav Canada without effective consultation that included affected communities and their elected representatives.

WHAT ARE WE EXPERIENCING? A disproportionate amount of excessive noise from whining, low flying aircraft that represents approximately 40 percent of all arrivals at Pearson’s 24 hour operation. Sleep disruption and other accompanying health risks are presenting themselves and are of great concern.

WHAT ARE WE ASKING FOR? T.A.N.G. is committed to achieving an amended airspace design which takes a more balanced, community sensitive approach to safe flight traffic for Toronto residents.

WHAT HAVE WE DONE? Over the last three years T.A.N.G. has engaged with local, provincial and federal politicians, made representations at the Community Environmental Noise Advisory Committee, met with Toronto’s Chief Medical Officer, undertaken extensive research on why and how Nav Canada created this intolerable flight path, attempted to engage with Nav Canada and, most importantly, made two submissions to the Honourable Lisa Raitt, MP, Minister of Transport in which we have proposed solutions.

Our most recent submission to the Minister, dated November, 2014 was prepared for us by an active airline captain with 35 years’ experience. Captain Inch believes that the current flight path, and others at Pearson, not only cause much more aviation noise than is necessary but also burn more fuel and extend flight times. His submission, prepared on behalf of T.A.N.G. for the Minister of Transport, proposes detailed solutions to the unacceptable noise under which we live, many kilometres from the airport. These solutions focus on an arrivals profile which keeps aircraf higher and also an amendment to the path which reduces the time over residential areas and follows a shorter approach to Pearson. Because of the time and cost savings involved these solutions are proving to be of interest to airlines and other air industry professionals. Captain Inch has now had discussions with Transport Canada staff and representatives from Nav Canada on these proposals. These discussions have been facilitated by MP John Carmichael, Don Valley West and the Minister’s office. We have recently been informed by the Minister that “our submissions will be considered as a part of our evaluation process.” We are confident that, with this submission to the Minister, we have been able to demonstrate clearly that there are innovative and effective solutions to the noise problem created three years ago by Nav Canada. We look to the Minister to ensure that the work now underway results in the implementation, in a timely manner, of these or other viable proposals for relief from aircraf noise.

The submission can be read in full on the T.A.N.G. website, listed under the Inch Report:

www.northtoronto.wordpress.com

Please add your voice by emailing the Minister with your concerns: lisa.raitt.c1@parl.gc.ca

Toronto Aviation Noise Group (T.A.N.G.) Update #3
We have received an update on T.A.N.G.’s work to find a solution to the problem of living under a high concentrated flight path to Pearson, implemented in Feb, 2012.  We have updated their notes and images from a powerpoint presentation which together outline the results of   their research and their current position on possible mitigation strategies.  This material is somewhat technical in its present form but will be useful in helping you understand what T.A.N.G. has been doing in the last several months.  This material has gone to the Minister of Transport, Lisa Raitt,for her consideration.

You can submit a noise complaint to GTAA Noise Complaints at 416-247-7682 or http://www.torontopearson.com/en/noisecomplaint/#

TANG Update #3
TANG APRIL-2014 PPT REV-7


Melting Snow and Rain can lead to Basement Flooding
(extracted from the City of Toronto website)

The combination of melting snow and rain can lead to basement flooding.  Here are some tips to help:

 

Winter-wise water tips (extracted from Our Toronto, Vol 6 Issue 3)
It’s time for winter maintenance and preparation.  The City is continually updating and maintaining Toronto’s complex underground pipes, sewers, and catch basins.  There are also steps you should take to help get your home ready for the wintry weather.  Here are a few:


Toronto Historical Maps Online

If you ever toiled away at researching the history of your neighbourhood the City’s historical maps are generally the first place you look.  And it has just been made easier—Nathan Ng has put together a website of the City’s historical maps that is easy to use and navigate.  The Toronto Star Article featuring Nathan Ng who compiled the historical maps is provided below:

Online Toronto maps project puts the history of familiar streets a click away

The direct links to the collection of historical maps are provided below for your reference:
Blog: Historical Maps of Toronto
Post: Explore Toronto’s past through maps…
Link: http://oldtorontomaps.blogspot.com/2013/02/welcome-to-historical-maps-of-toronto.html
http://goadstoronto.blogspot.ca/

Newsletters prior to 2012: NEWSLETTER-SEPT-2011-Final[2]
Newsletter-April-2011[1]
Newsletter-Sept-2010[1]    
Newsletter-April-2010[1]    
Newsletter-Spring-2009[1]    
Newsletter-Feb-2008[1]  
Newsletter-March-2007[1]
Newsletter Winter 2007